The Black Crowes Reunite for ‘Shake Your Money Maker’ 30th Anniversary

It has been six years since The Black Crowes played their final show on December 14, 2013, but over the last few months, rumors have been running rampant about a reunion. Last month, the Wall Street Journal published an article stating many industry sources have hinted something was in the works for a Black Crowes reunion. Last week the band’s social media accounts and website were updated with new art, and earlier this week there were reports of digital billboards with the same artwork in Wisconsin from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

The initial dates of the anniversary tour were announced the early hours of November 9, when the poster showed up on an electronic billboard in New York City’s Penn Station. On July 17, 2020 at PNC Bank Arts Center and July 18 at Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater, The Black Crowes will reunite for the 30th anniversary of their debut album ‘Shake Your Money Maker,’ by playing the album in its entirety along with “all the hits.”

The reunion is rumored to be led by founding brothers Chris and Rich Robinson, whose often strained relationship was what caused the band to break up not just in 2015 but also back in 2002. When former drummer and founding member of Black Crowes, Steve Gorman, was approached about the reunion he said the band will not likely be bringing in members from the past.

I think they’re in a place where, I would imagine, they’re not interested in having anybody from the past work with them. It just makes it cleaner and easier, because to bring people back to do it right, you have a lot of explaining to do, you have a lot of apologizing to do, and you’ve gotta make up for a lot of damage you’ve caused.

Steve Gorman – Former drummer and founding member of The Balck Crowes

The band broke up in 2015 over what seemed to be one of the many arguments between the Robinson brothers. In January of 2015, Rich Robinson released a statement announcing the band’s break-up, going into some detail about discrepancies over band ownership and money.